Heron

Suicide Drone

The first Heron was developed in 1994 by  Israel Aerospace Industries . It is a medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) capble of 52 hours of flight, at up to 10.5 KM.  The Heron TP was developed based on the Heron as an unmanned reconnaissance aircraft. Both have been weaponized.

The Heron 1 has been used by the German Air Force in Afghanistan and Mali, and a contract with Germany to lease Heron TP drones, with weaponizing capabilities, raised political controversy in Germany. In 2020 it was reported that India will arm Heron UAVs with missiles and bombs.

Heron 1

The Heron is today one of the most used unmanned vehicles of the Israeli Air Force and used regularly in both Gaza and Lebanon. Introduced to the Israeli Air Force in 2001, it took part in many military operations.

On 27th December 2008, the first day of IDF offensive operation Cast Lead, an IDF drone, either Heron or Hermes 450, launched a missile against a group of people across the street from the UNRWA-sponsored Gaza Technical College in downtown Gaza City killing twelve, nine of whom were students and three were civilian bystanders. On 29th December, drones (again, either Hermes 450, or Herons) launched a missile at a truck outside a metal shop in Jabalya. Eight people died in the attack including four minors. The owner of the truck Ahmed Samur, whose son died in the strike, in an interview with B’Tselem denied any connection to Hamas and said that the truck was shipping oxygen cannisters of metal welding.

Heron

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

The first Heron drone was developed in 1994 by Israeli Aerospace Industries (IAI). It is a medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) capable of 52 hours of flight, at up to 10.5 KM.  The Heron TP was developed based on the Heron as an unmanned reconnaissance aircraft. Both have been weaponized.

The Heron-1 has been used by GermanyCanada and Australia in Afghanistan and by Germany in Mali. A contract with Germany to lease Heron-TP drones, with weaponizing capabilities, raised political controversy in Germany. In 2020 it was reported that India will arm Heron UAVs with missiles and bombs.

Variations:  Heron-1, Super Heron, Harfang/Eagle (France), Heron-TP (Eitan), Heron MK-II.

Heron TP

In 2007 IAI’s new Heron drone, called Heron-TP (Eitan), was unveiled at Israel’s Tel Nof Air Force Base. At the media event an IAF official said the IAI and the IAF had tested “all kinds of payloads, in all kinds of configuration schemes.” Apart from its intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) role, Haaretz said the Eitan can also be armed for defense and long-range strategic strikes.[1]  IAI’s giant Heron TP has a wing span of 26m and a payload of over 1000kg; it can remain airborne for close to 40 hours and cover a distance of up to 7,500km.

Heron 1

Use by Israeli forces:

The Heron is today one of the most used unmanned vehicles of the Israeli Air Force and used regularly in both Gaza and Lebanon. Introduced to the Israeli Air Force in 2001, it took part in many military operations.

After Operation “Cast Lead” in late 2008 and early 2009, an investigation of HRW concluded that dozens of civilians were killed with missiles launched from drones.[2] 

A CONFIDENTIAL REPORT by Israeli military police investigators seen by “The Intercept” exposed how an airstrike in which four Palestinian boys playing on a beach in Gaza in 2014 were killed by missiles launched from an armed drone, being a Heron or a Hermes drone.[3]

Heron TP drones have been used in Gaza. The Heron TP was used during Operation “Protective Edge”, during which 37% of fatalities were attributed to drone attacks, according to an estimate by the Gaza-based Al Mezan Center for Human Rights[4] .The Heron TP Eitan drone was also used during Israel’s Operation “Cast Lead”.

Heron drones were also used during operation “Guardian of the Walls” in 2021.

Heron

Suicide Drone

The first Heron drone was developed in 1994 by Israeli Aerospace Industries (IAI). It is a medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) capable of 52 hours of flight, at up to 10.5 KM.  The Heron TP was developed based on the Heron as an unmanned reconnaissance aircraft. Both have been weaponized.  

The Heron 1 has been used by Germany, Canada and Australia in Afghanistan and by Germany in Mali. A contract with Germany to lease Heron TP drones, with weaponizing capabilities, raised political controversy in Germany. In 2020 it was reported that India will arm Heron UAVs with missiles and bombs.

Heron TP

In 2007 IAI’s new Heron drone, called Heron TP (Eitan), was unveiled at Israel’s Tel Nof Air Force Base. At the media event an IAF official said the IAI and the IAF had tested “all kinds of payloads, in all kinds of configuration schemes.” Apart from its intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) role, Haaretz said the Eitan can also be armed for defense and long-range strategic strikes.[1]  IAI’s giant Heron TP has a wing span of 26m and a payload of over 1000kg; it can remain airborne for close to 40 hours and cover a distance of up to 7,500km.

These drones have been used in Gaza. The Heron TP was used during Operation Protective Edge, during which 37% of fatalities were attributed to drone attacks, according to an estimate by the Gaza-based Al Mezan Center for Human Rights.[2] The Heron TP Eitan drone was also used during Israel’s Operation Cast Lead.

Heron 1

The Heron is today one of the most used unmanned vehicles of the Israeli Air Force and used regularly in both Gaza and Lebanon. Introduced to the Israeli Air Force in 2001, it took part in many military operations.

On 27th December 2008, the first day of IDF offensive operation Cast Lead, an IDF drone, either Heron or Hermes 450, launched a missile against a group of people across the street from the UNRWA-sponsored Gaza Technical College in downtown Gaza City killing twelve, nine of whom were students and three were civilian bystanders. On 29th December, drones (again, either Hermes 450, or Herons) launched a missile at a truck outside a metal shop in Jabalya. Eight people died in the attack including four minors. The owner of the truck Ahmed Samur, whose son died in the strike, in an interview with B’Tselem denied any connection to Hamas and said that the truck was shipping oxygen cannisters of metal welding.