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Arms Sold:

Searcher UAV

UT30MK2 torret

Companies:

Israel Military Industries (IMI)

Skip to:

Indonesia

Introduction:

Israel and Indonesia, although not having formal ties, maintain strong economic and military cooperation and trade. The two countries established different joint institutions in aim to develop economic partnership and keep strong ties around security, including Indonesian forces that trained in Israel. Israel exports a wide range of arms to Indonesia since the 1960s, including radars, combat jets and drones.

Israel - Indonesia Relations:

Israel and Indonesia maintain no formal diplomatic ties, although they maintain quiet trade, tourism and security contacts. Trade between Jakarta and Tel Aviv have reportedly reached $400-500 million in 2015, almost 88 percent of which is Indonesian exports. While Indonesia mainly ships commodities, Israel’s exports are primarily high-tech products.[1] In addition, the two countries have also established organizations, albeit unofficial, that aim to bolster ties. The Indonesia-Israel Public Affairs Committee (IIPAC) was created in 2002. IIPAC has around 4,450 members. It has also led to the creation of the Indonesian Business Lobby, which aims to facilitate Israeli investment in the country. [2] To facilitate the growing partnership, the Israel-Indonesia Chamber of Commerce[3] was established in Tel Aviv in 2009. This organization is a subsidiary of the Israel-Asia Chamber of Commerce and aims to strengthen the Indonesia-Israel economic partnership despite the absence of diplomatic offices in both countries.[4]

In 2008, the Indonesian government signed a USD $200,000 worth agreement with Israel’s national emergency service Magen David Adom (MDA) and the American-Israel Joint Distribution Committee to provide medical training to paramedics in Indonesia.[5][6]

Regarding official visits, Shimon Peres traveled to Indonesia in the year 2000 as minister of regional cooperation. Several Indonesian delegations have also made their way to Israel. In 2013, for example, a group of high-ranking Indonesian delegations made a secret visit to the Knesset, and in 2015 Indonesia also attended Israel’s Homeland Security convention held in Tel Aviv.[7]

In 2019 a delegation from the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce travelled to Israel to discuss the establishment of trade relations and cooperation between the two countries.[8]

Military relations:

Military and intelligence ties were opened through unofficial channels in 1968. In 1971 counter-battery radars for accurate artillery fire were bought by the Indonesian military from the Israel Military Industries (IMI). In March 1974, a team of 27 officers and 90 soldiers from the Indonesian Army were sent to study a 2-month course to Israel on artillery radar and land surveillance, as well as ELINT and SIGINT from the Israeli Army.

In January 1975, the Indonesian Navy and Indonesian Air Force sent a 60-man team to Israel to learn special insertion and covert operations from Shayetet 13 and the Israeli Navy. The result was the establishment of a Special Forces Training School to train small units of the Kopassus in airborne and seaborne insertion, in November 1975. In August 1976, Indonesian and Israeli Chiefs of Air Staff met during a supposedly coincidental visit to Tehran to discuss the Indonesian procurement of 35 Douglas A-4 Skyhawk fighter aircraft from Israel, which were ultimately delivered in 1981-82.[9]  In 2006 Indonesia made a $6m deal with the Philippine company Kital for the delivery of four Israeli Searcher-II drones. Indonesia planned to use the drones for surveillance of the Indonesian archipelago and Malacca Straits.[10]

Although there is no specific information about the number of riot-vehicles purchased by Indonesia from the Israeli company Beit Alfa Technologies, there are existing reports about the vehicles being used by Indonesian forces.[11][12][13]

In 2019 hacking attempts were committed against activists in Indonesia. The device that was used is said to be Pegasus by the Israeli firm NSO Group Technologies.[14] According to the Director of the human rights organization LOKATARU it is highly possible that the government is keeping constant tabs on activists. The use of Pegasus was confirmed by two House Commission I members: PDIP member Muara Sakti Simbolon and Democrat Party legislator Sjarifuddin Hasan.[15] 

Usage of Israeli Arms:

UT30 MK2 unmanned turret – in use by Indonesian Army

Aerostar TUAV – in use by Indonesian Air Force: Skadron Udara 51.         

Pegasus – was reportedly being used by the government against activists.

Human Rights Violations:

The Indonesian mass killings of 1965:

On 1 October 1965 an alleged coup attempt took place in Jakarta, Indonesia. A small group of militants military tried to seize power and six army generals were killed. What precisely happened and who was really responsible has never been established. General Suharto crushed the possible coup attempt within days and blamed the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) for masterminding the coup attempt.  A nationwide campaign of human rights violations was carried out against all those considered members of the PKI and suspected sympathizers. According to different estimates, the number of victims may well have reached half a million deaths. Killings, arrests, torture, and disappearances lasted for several years; arbitrary detention and forced labor for more than ten years. Discrimination lasts until today, fifty years later.[16]

Today:

Human rights issues included reports of arbitrary or unlawful killings by government security forces; torture by police; arbitrary detention by the government; harsh and life-threatening conditions in prisons and detention centers; political prisoners; censorship, including laws addressing treason, blasphemy, defamation, and decency, site blocking, and criminal libel; corruption and attempts by government elements to undermine efforts to prosecute corrupt officials; criminalization of same-sex sexual activities at the local level and violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) persons; and forced or compulsory labor.[17]

In 2019 more than 50 people died in Indonesia in demonstrations around the country and 6,100 cases of people that faced prosecution for expressing their opinion in public. In terms of civil rights violations, 53 percent of those cases were violations of freedom of expression and 32 percent were violations of the freedom of assembly. [18]

In the past 12 years more than 2,400 cases of religious freedom violations were documented by the Setara Institute for Democracy and Peace.[19]

Sales Records Table:

Download as XLS or PDF or view the Google-Doc

Product
Company
Year
Deal Size
Comments
Source
Aerostar tactical UAVs
Aeronautics
2012
https:// www.indomiliter.com/aerostar-tuav-drone-intai-andalan-skadron-udara-51-tni-au/
4 searcher-II drones
IAI
2006 (2012)
through a phillipine private company
Sipri, https://dronewarsuk.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/israel-and-the-drone-wars.pdf
22 Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFV) UT30MK2 unmanned turrets
Elbit (Ares)
2019 (2021-2022)
Indonesia
for use on Pandur II APCs
https://www.israeldefense.co.il/en/node/42428. Sipri

1. ^ https://thediplomat.com/2015/03/the-quiet-growth-in-indonesia-israel-relations/

2. ^ https://thediplomat.com/2015/03/the-quiet-growth-in-indonesia-israel-relations/

3. ^ http://israel-indonesia-coc.org/

4. ^ https://thediplomat.com/2015/03/the-quiet-growth-in-indonesia-israel-relations/

5. ^ https://thediplomat.com/2015/03/the-quiet-growth-in-indonesia-israel-relations/

6. ^ https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2008/11/07/representatives-indonesia-israel-sign-medical-agreement.html?1

7. ^ https://thediplomat.com/2015/03/the-quiet-growth-in-indonesia-israel-relations/

8. ^ https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20190710-indonesian-delegation-visits-israel-for-trade-and-cooperation/

9. ^ Sipri

10. ^ https://www.flightglobal.com/indonesia-buys-israeli-uavs-despite-protests/70350.article

11. ^ https://jfjfp.com/using-palestinians-as-free-way-to-test-new-weapons-of-people-control/

12. ^ https://whoprofits.org/company/beit-alpha-technologies-b-a-t/

13. ^ https://www.israeldefense.co.il/he/content/%D7%93%D7%92%D7%9D-%D7%97%D7%93%D7%A9-%D7%9C%D7%A8%D7%9B%D7%91-%D7%A4%D7%99%D7%96%D7%95%D7%A8-%D7%94%D7%A4%D7%92%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%AA

14. ^ https://en.tempo.co/read/1359036/tracing-pegasus-a-spyware-allegedly-used-in-indonesia

15. ^ https://en.tempo.co/read/1359036/tracing-pegasus-a-spyware-allegedly-used-in-indonesia

16. ^ https://www.indonesia1965.org/wordpress/

17. ^ https://www.state.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/INDONESIA-2018.pdf

18. ^ https://jakartaglobe.id/news/civil-rights-violations-on-the-up-in-indonesia/

19. ^ https://jakartaglobe.id/news/when-it-comes-to-violations-of-religious-freedom-police-are-no-better-than-fpi-study-says/

Indonesia

Israel and Indonesia, although not having formal ties, maintain strong economic and military cooperation and trade. The two countries established different joint institutions in aim to develop economic partnership and keep strong ties around security, including Indonesian forces that trained in Israel. Israel exports a wide range of arms to Indonesia since the 1960s, including radars, combat jets and drones.

Israel and Indonesia maintain no formal diplomatic ties, although they maintain quiet trade, tourism and security contacts. Trade between Jakarta and Tel Aviv have reportedly reached $400-500 million in 2015, almost 88 percent of which is Indonesian exports. While Indonesia mainly ships commodities, Israel’s exports are primarily high-tech products.[1] In addition, the two countries have also established organizations, albeit unofficial, that aim to bolster ties. The Indonesia-Israel Public Affairs Committee (IIPAC) was created in 2002. IIPAC has around 4,450 members. It has also led to the creation of the Indonesian Business Lobby, which aims to facilitate Israeli investment in the country. [2] To facilitate the growing partnership, the Israel-Indonesia Chamber of Commerce[3] was established in Tel Aviv in 2009. This organization is a subsidiary of the Israel-Asia Chamber of Commerce and aims to strengthen the Indonesia-Israel economic partnership despite the absence of diplomatic offices in both countries.[4]

In 2008, the Indonesian government signed a USD $200,000 worth agreement with Israel’s national emergency service Magen David Adom (MDA) and the American-Israel Joint Distribution Committee to provide medical training to paramedics in Indonesia.[5][6]

Regarding official visits, Shimon Peres traveled to Indonesia in the year 2000 as minister of regional cooperation. Several Indonesian delegations have also made their way to Israel. In 2013, for example, a group of high-ranking Indonesian delegations made a secret visit to the Knesset, and in 2015 Indonesia also attended Israel’s Homeland Security convention held in Tel Aviv.[7]

In 2019 a delegation from the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce travelled to Israel to discuss the establishment of trade relations and cooperation between the two countries.[8]

Military and intelligence ties were opened through unofficial channels in 1968. In 1971 counter-battery radars for accurate artillery fire were bought by the Indonesian military from the Israel Military Industries (IMI). In March 1974, a team of 27 officers and 90 soldiers from the Indonesian Army were sent to study a 2-month course to Israel on artillery radar and land surveillance, as well as ELINT and SIGINT from the Israeli Army.

In January 1975, the Indonesian Navy and Indonesian Air Force sent a 60-man team to Israel to learn special insertion and covert operations from Shayetet 13 and the Israeli Navy. The result was the establishment of a Special Forces Training School to train small units of the Kopassus in airborne and seaborne insertion, in November 1975. In August 1976, Indonesian and Israeli Chiefs of Air Staff met during a supposedly coincidental visit to Tehran to discuss the Indonesian procurement of 35 Douglas A-4 Skyhawk fighter aircraft from Israel, which were ultimately delivered in 1981-82.[9]  In 2006 Indonesia made a $6m deal with the Philippine company Kital for the delivery of four Israeli Searcher-II drones. Indonesia planned to use the drones for surveillance of the Indonesian archipelago and Malacca Straits.[10]

Although there is no specific information about the number of riot-vehicles purchased by Indonesia from the Israeli company Beit Alfa Technologies, there are existing reports about the vehicles being used by Indonesian forces.[11][12][13]

In 2019 hacking attempts were committed against activists in Indonesia. The device that was used is said to be Pegasus by the Israeli firm NSO Group Technologies.[14] According to the Director of the human rights organization LOKATARU it is highly possible that the government is keeping constant tabs on activists. The use of Pegasus was confirmed by two House Commission I members: PDIP member Muara Sakti Simbolon and Democrat Party legislator Sjarifuddin Hasan.[15] 

UT30 MK2 unmanned turret – in use by Indonesian Army

Aerostar TUAV – in use by Indonesian Air Force: Skadron Udara 51.         

Pegasus – was reportedly being used by the government against activists.

The Indonesian mass killings of 1965:

On 1 October 1965 an alleged coup attempt took place in Jakarta, Indonesia. A small group of militants military tried to seize power and six army generals were killed. What precisely happened and who was really responsible has never been established. General Suharto crushed the possible coup attempt within days and blamed the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) for masterminding the coup attempt.  A nationwide campaign of human rights violations was carried out against all those considered members of the PKI and suspected sympathizers. According to different estimates, the number of victims may well have reached half a million deaths. Killings, arrests, torture, and disappearances lasted for several years; arbitrary detention and forced labor for more than ten years. Discrimination lasts until today, fifty years later.[16]

Today:
 

Human rights issues included reports of arbitrary or unlawful killings by government security forces; torture by police; arbitrary detention by the government; harsh and life-threatening conditions in prisons and detention centers; political prisoners; censorship, including laws addressing treason, blasphemy, defamation, and decency, site blocking, and criminal libel; corruption and attempts by government elements to undermine efforts to prosecute corrupt officials; criminalization of same-sex sexual activities at the local level and violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) persons; and forced or compulsory labor.[17]

In 2019 more than 50 people died in Indonesia in demonstrations around the country and 6,100 cases of people that faced prosecution for expressing their opinion in public. In terms of civil rights violations, 53 percent of those cases were violations of freedom of expression and 32 percent were violations of the freedom of assembly. [18]

In the past 12 years more than 2,400 cases of religious freedom violations were documented by the Setara Institute for Democracy and Peace.[19]

Download as XLS or PDF or view the Google-Doc

Product
Company
Year
Deal Size
Comments
Source
Aerostar tactical UAVs
Aeronautics
2012
https:// www.indomiliter.com/aerostar-tuav-drone-intai-andalan-skadron-udara-51-tni-au/
4 searcher-II drones
IAI
2006 (2012)
through a phillipine private company
Sipri, https://dronewarsuk.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/israel-and-the-drone-wars.pdf
22 Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFV) UT30MK2 unmanned turrets
Elbit (Ares)
2019 (2021-2022)
Indonesia
for use on Pandur II APCs
https://www.israeldefense.co.il/en/node/42428. Sipri